2015 McLaren 650S – Exotic Redefined »

In only a couple of years, McLaren has created an exotic that raises the bar on the competition.

F1 For the Road – The Ferrari F50 »

It’s not often one gets handed the keys to a million dollar car. Well in this case, about 1.6 million, but who’s counting.

Performance Redefined: Nissan GTR »

The Nissan GTR is a bit of an enigma. It’s one of the rare few that satisfies more than one personality traits. It’s nearly untouchable at the Ring, only beat by the million dollar Porsche 918 when counting series production vehicles.

Life Lessons, Courtesy of Mercedes »

Before we start, I need to apologize for being late. Partly due to real life getting in the way, but mostly due to the fact that I struggled to write this.

Canadian JDM Invasion – Honda Integra Type-R »

This week, I had a chance to check out NRGie’s 1996 Honda Integra Type-R. While GTRs have dominated the JDM imports, the ITR is a bit of a hidden gem out of Japan.


July 2nd, 2015

nurburgring-logo
["Wait a minute, it's not Monday!" ... Shhhhhhh]

The internet is alight over the Nurburgring’s management company enforcing speed limits on a few of its sections for everyone, including sanctioned races and manufacturer testing, after the tragic death of a spectator when a vehicle lifted off the track and flew into stands. Artificial speed limits in motorsport pretty much defeat the purpose, negatively affecting the spectacle for fans and likely taking away from the drivers’ experience as well. Now, of course the German Motorsport Association had to work with Nurburgring management to do something. The only thing worse than a spectator death would be another spectator death caused by the exact same thing. There wasn’t enough time to either fix the course or remove the stands in that area, so they implemented a speed limit. Just about anything else would have been knee-jerk and likely executed without the necessary planning to make sure it’s the best course of action. They did the same thing any one of us would do at our own job. Band-aid it for now and fix it properly after thinking about it sans fire under our asses. Yes it sucks, but I think they made the right call.

Of course, my opinion hinges on the fact that this will be temporary. They’ve promised to revisit the speed limits at the end of the year and I’m banking on them saying “Yeah, this just won’t do”. Maybe I’m wrong. Maybe management won’t like the cost of implementing a better solution and the speed limits will stay forever. Green Hell would turn into Green Gables and I’d be right there with you, having a good cry.

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June 24th, 2015

mclaren-650S-coupe-2

I recently had the privileged of driving a car that most people can only dream of driving. Sure, you can pay a sum of money and head to LA or Las Vegas and rent one for a few laps, but those types of experiences are all about thrill seeking. When you get the opportunity to drive an exotic super-car, you take it and enjoy every moment of it.

I’m not going to bore you with the details of what makes up a 650S. That type of information can be found on the internet. Lets talk about how the car looks and feels.

The 650S literally looks like the bridge design between where McLaren production cars started and where they are now. The front is all P1 / 570S and the rear is all MP4-12C. The car is striking. I really love the front of the car. It’s aggressive and unique without being arrogant. The rear of the car is all business. It’s neat, tidy and functional. The high mounted exhaust exits are perfectly placed and convey that the 650S is no ordinary car. Some say it is the face-lift of the 12C, but other say it is a step up bringing it closer to the P1.

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June 22nd, 2015

honda-civic-type-r-concept-paris-10

You’ll be hard pressed to find a Canadian car maker with a more dedicated and loyal following than Honda. I don’t say that because the Civic has been the best selling passenger car in Canada for 5 years running. I say it because the Civic hasn’t been the best car in the segment for all of those 5 years, but people kept on buying them.

Prior to the global recession of 2007, Honda could boast a reputation of performance with cars like the NSX, Integra Type R and S2000. Unfortunately, once money became tight the name of game became selling as many cars as possible, and that meant putting performance and fun on the back-burner. Honda stopped making the S2000, pulled out of Formula 1 and began an era of cheap and boring vehicles for the everyman. They rode the 8th generation Civic for as long as they could before releasing arguably the worst Civic ever in the 2012 North American model. It felt cheap, it looked old and it handled worse than anything else in the class. The 2012 was so poorly received that they did a refresh the very next year. How often does that happen? During this downturn of fun (frownturn, if you will) they did their best to ride the NSX buzz trying to convince people they still knew how to go fast. Sorry guys, but droning on about a prototype for 5 years doesn’t fool anybody.

Well lucky for the Honda fanboy, and the enthusiast in general, the company has clearly had a change of heart and decided that fun is back on the menu. The new NSX was finally unveiled in production trim and it looks stunning, but looks aren’t what we care about right now. The performance they’re claiming is on par with current exotics, and that’s right where it needed to be. Its hybrid powertrain, with electric motors individually powering the front wheels, is similar to the million dollar Porsche 918, though Honda’s version only makes about 550 horsepower. Speaking of hybrids, Honda also entered the new era of Formula 1 with some of the most complex energy recovery systems in the world. The results aren’t coming to them yet, but just the fact that they’re competing again is evidence that their attitude has changed for the better. It’s more than a step in the right direction, it’s leaps and bounds.

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June 17th, 2015

google-builds-self-driving-

Two weeks ago the state of Virginia announced that 70 miles of their public highways would be open to autonomous vehicles for testing. They join California, Nevada, Florida, Michigan and Washington DC in accommodating the new technology, and trusting the owners not to cause havoc. We figured it was a good time to give everybody a quick review of where we are with driverless cars today. For those new to the game, autonomous vehicles (AVs) are cars which can drive themselves around town, with no input from a human. You sit down, set your destination and sit back to absorb the reality that you’re doing something only Batman and cheesy action stars have done in movies. While there are more than half a dozen manufacturers in the game right now, including Audi, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan and Tesla, it’s tech giant Google at the forefront.

Google recently began releasing reports on the status on their autonomous car project with began in 2009 with modified Priuses. The latest report mentions that they’ve accumulated nearly 3 million kilometers on their test vehicles since the program’s inception, over half of which were in their autonomous mode where the safety driver does not touch the controls except in the case of emergencies. Over the last 6 years Google reports they’ve been involved in a dozen collisions, all of which were the fault of outside drivers. Three million kilometers and zero at-fault accidents? Good luck finding a human with that track record. That said, they may not be completely blameless. Some California residents are claiming the cars don’t drive “normally”. One blogger says they “drive like your grandma”, moving from lights slowly, leaving humongous gaps and, most importantly here, braking at the slightest hint of an obstacle. This means that an intersection which looks clear to a human may not look clear to the Google AV, causing the AV to brake unexpectedly and get rear-ended. Now obviously nobody is blaming the AV for getting rear-ended, but it highlights the fact that you can’t just have a car that stays in its lane and doesn’t run people over in order to be successful. Until we get used to everybody driving like a grandma, having cars that act like the humans around them will contribute to safety.

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June 11th, 2015

honda-civic-type-r-concept-paris-10

Good news for those who have been eagerly anticipating any news on whether the Civic Type-R will be coming to Canada. We’ve posted about the progress of this vehicle a few times including the concept version we shot when we were at the Paris Motor Show which is pictured above. At the time, the Type-R was not expected to arrive in North America but at the New York Auto Show Honda showed off a “global model” leading to speculation that the hot hatch would be making the trip across the pond.

Today, sources have confirmed that Honda Canada has announced via its dealership network employee eBiz portal that the Type-R will indeed be arriving in Canadian dealerships. At this point, no pricing information or any other details are available but we’ll keep our eyes peeled for any official news from Honda Canada.

If you forgot, the new Type-R redefines Civic performance by offering a more than 280hp in the Honda hot hatch. Coupled with a slick shifting 6 speed manual transmission and the ability to rev to 7000rpm, Honda promises the new Civic Type-R to exceed performance from the previous Type-R’s, which includes the Integra, Accord, and even the NSX.


June 9th, 2015

JD Power’s 2015 vehicle dependability study, tracking issues with over 34,000 model-year 2012 original owner vehicles, was recently released and it caused a bit of confusion on the forums. While JD Power do a decent job of explaining their process separately on their website, they don’t include this information on the infographic so people are left to build their own interpretation. So people see things like an industry average 147 problems per 100 vehicles and assume that means any car they buy will end up in the shop within 3 years. A lot of people find this unacceptable, but there are two big reasons to have a positive attitude about this.

First is the fact that it’s ONLY 147 problems per 100 vehicles. Ten years ago that figure was 237. The only brands over 200 PP100 this year were Land Rover and Fiat. We’ve got more and more cars on the road every day, and despite the fact that they add parts and complexity every generation, cars are also becoming generally more reliable.

The more significant reason to be happy about the results of this study is that a “problem” by JD Power’s definition isn’t necessarily the kind of problem you’re thinking of. They have a list 177 predefined issues they ask the vehicle owner about. So what were the top problems this year?

Bluetooth connectivity and voice recognition.

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June 1st, 2015

chevy-bolt-concept-ev-naias-2015-11

We got a brief reprieve from $1.30/L gas prices when oil tanked (zing), but less than a month later we’re nearly back to where we started. Alberta may be oil country, but that doesn’t mean people are willing to get bent over at the pump forever. We still love our V8s (and always will), but it’s starting to make more and more sense to pick up a more efficient commuter. It’s not just gas prices, but an entire culture of eco-friendliness which is driving the push for efficient vehicles elsewhere in North America. Consumers are demanding green cars and the manufacturers are being forced to respond. Hybrids and electrics are stealing the headlines right now, but North America is also seeing a reemergence of the sub-compact segment which hasn’t had much hold here in over a decade. While Canadian sales of sedans like the Camry, Accord and Fusion dropped from 2013 to 2014, we saw double digit increases for small cars like the Accent, Fit, Yaris and Mirage.

Of course, not everybody wants a tiny hatchback, and a lot of people require more capable vehicles, which means going with something larger and, usually, far less efficient. Luckily for them, manufacturers are being pressured to increase efficiency across their entire range. CAFE regulations, which penalize manufacturers whose fleet doesn’t meet a minimum fuel efficiency requirement, have raised the bar for small passenger cars by over 40% since 2005. They will continue increasing it by another 5% annually until 2025 where they’ll mandate 60 mpg. This means that car makers don’t just need to offer a fuel efficient car to those who want one, they need to increase the efficiency of their entire line-up or pay significant penalties. Now technically CAFE only applies to cars built in the United States, but Canadian Environmental Protection Act was recently amended to include very similar provisions for cars built here.

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April 14th, 2015

dannie-riel-calgary-2015

Driven 2015 will be rolling into Calgary next month and we’re excited to announce that Dannie Riel will be at our booth if you want to meet her, grab some posters and get your picture taken with her! Driven 2015 is one of the most anticipated aftermarket car shows to hit Calgary and this year it will be bigger and better than ever promising a huge showcase of exotics as part of the Pursuit 2015 car show. Your Driven 2015 ticket will get you access to both shows.

For more details on the show, hit up the official website:
Driven Show 2015: http://www.drivenshow.ca


April 7th, 2015

mclaren-f1-gt-xp-056-2

One of three. Seeing a McLaren F1 in person is rare enough, but to see the most rare of all, the McLaren F1 XPGT (Experimental Prototype GT) definitely tops some sort of list. McLaren had brought this F1 out at the Geneva Auto Show to showcase the new McLaren 675LT “Longtail”, as this was the prototype Longtail that McLaren needed to build for homologating the F1 GTR race car. McLaren didn’t even need to build any more F1 GT’s, but they built 2 more to satisfy their wealthy clientele, hence, one of three.

The XPGT, owned by McLaren, rarely leaves the factory. It rarely leaves Europe, so seeing it displayed at the New York Auto Show in Manhattan was just something else. It was only out in the open for a single non public day, so unfortunately, the chance to see her is gone.

You can read more on the history and story of the XPGT #056 over at the McLaren website. We were able to get some close up shots of her, check it out after the jump.

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April 2nd, 2015

2016-mitsubishi-outlander-nyias-4

Mitsubishi just revealed the 2016 Outlander which has received a few visual changes as part of a mid cycle refresh. The changes are quite subtle and unless you’re familiar with the Outlander, you probably wouldn’t even notice anything was changed.

The most obvious change is the revised front bumper that smooths out some of the more aggressive chiseled elements under the headlights. On the sides, the front fascia now bulges out slightly. Together with a modified grille featuring beefier slats the new front end design which Mitsubishi calls “Dynamic Shield” gives the Outlander the appearance of a wider stance. The look was inspired from the bumper side protection seen on generations of the Montero providing unique protection for both people and car. Down the side, the lower part of the doors get some new garnish giving the Outlander a more rugged look.

Inside is a redesigned steering wheel, seats and trim, and rear folding seats. The revised 2016 Outlander will go on sale this summer. Check out some pictures of the changes on the 2016 Outlander after the break.

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